The Illusion of 'Legal Immigration vs Illegal Immigration'.


Legal replacement is White genocide.


Often the unthinking speak of the alleged distinctions between

'Legal Immigration vs Illegal Immigration'.


Here I will explain in a short and simple manner for everyone to comprehend, that all current forms of mass immigration, which are leading to demographic shifts within White nations - namely the dramatic decline of percentage of those of European descent - are in fact inherently illegal.


Legal mass non-White immigration into White nations is actually impossible.


It's an oxymoron because genocide is considered a 'Crime Against Humanity' and is thus illegal under international law. And under the provision of international law - the legal definition of genocide does cover immigration as a means of which, leads to the finality of genocide.

"Article II

In the present Convention, genocide means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such:

(c) Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;"


Therefor you cannot have legal mass immigration of non-Whites into White nations.


Any mass immigration of non-Whites into White nations - however that immigration takes place - is necessarily illegal, as it leads to the ethnic replacement of the Whites there, which again, is classed as genocide under international law.

Mass non-White immigration is no accident, it is an intended process. Those responsible are willful agents in it's implementation. Mass non-White immigration into homogeneous White homelands, is inflicting conditions of life on the national, ethnical, racial or religious group, which have been calculated to bring about it's physical destruction, in whole or in part.

So clearly,
those who promote mass non-White immigration into White nations - regardless of how this immigration takes shape - are guilty of promoting genocide under the provision of international law.


By Raymond Foster